Len Cz’s Super Secret Method Software!!

An absolutely amazing winner-getter from one of the true, all-time world-class handicapping geniuses. 

No, we’re not talking about Len Cz (sorry Len!), so read on for all of the amazing details!  Seriously — don’t miss a detail —

everything you are about to read will help enhance your game (i.e., trips to the cashier’s windows) considerably!

 

Available in Paper & Pencil version as well.

 

 

The Super Secret Method! with SOR (SPEED OF RACE) Feature!!

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Introduction

Narrated by Len Czyzniejewski 

         You are looking at the first of a series of remarkable formulas put together by one of the most remarkable minds in horse racing.  Tom Harkins has spent most of his waking hours in the last forty years watching hundreds of thousands of races.  He is as close to a human computer as I’ve ever found, and has the ability to store and catalog countless facts and patterns that most of us mortals can only dream of.  This is a method I promised never to reveal, but Tom has since (recently) had a change of heart/mind, so here it is.

History

      

To those who have followed the RPM world, Tom Harkins has his own place of honor.  His publications are second to none when it comes to following this angle.  He is also a renowned columnist, penning hundreds of columns covering forty years of watching the races.  But by the end of this article, we are going to re-invent Tom Harkins, thus the need to “meet” him again.

 

At the risk of alienating most of Dave’s readership, a horse book is not high on the list of glamour spots in Las Vegas.  It consists of a bunch of large TV screens in front of dozens of desks, which may or may not have their own miniature TVs.  On most days it is populated with 95% males, and I, at age 57 am often the youngest patron there.  If it weren’t for the scantily dressed cocktail waitresses coming by, I’d find it almost depressing.  It’s not the spot casino marketers choose when trying to show the world what a wild town Vegas can be.

 

My entry into the story begins almost eleven years ago, upon my family’s arrival here.  This was before I spoiled myself by having a satellite dish installed solely for horseracing, with an Internet-getting computer in front of it, and my phone and trusty beeper close by to have all the comforts of home.  I haven’t convinced the wife to don the skimpy outfits and serve me drinks yet, but there’s always hope.  No, before I had everything I needed to play the races at home, I spent my spare time in race books.  I’d add having to walk twelve miles in the snow to get to them, but that might stretch credibility in the Las Vegas desert.

 

It was during these early visits that these impressions were formed.  I would see, for example, this big bald guy in a flannel shirt and a baseball hat, and wonder if that was going to be me in twenty years.  It might just turn out that way, as I find myself now closer to 60 than 30, but I did notice the guy in the baseball cap quite often.  He had stacks of papers  around him, and was constantly writing down numbers.  He also seemed to have people coming up and asking him questions.

 

Over the next few years I got to know him well.  Occasionally, we would start talking, sometimes for hours, and I slowly came to realize that I was in the presence of possibly the most knowledgeable person on horses I had ever met.

 

I was also pleased to see that a rapport seemed to be developing.  Tom can occasionally project a gruff exterior (as, to be fair, can I), but that’s sometimes necessary.  I noticed he does get pestered sometimes from guys wanting tips from him, when in reality he IS at work when he’s there.  But if you catch him at the right time, he’s a talking encyclopedia.

 

Of course, eventually, conversations got around to how exactly  HE plays horses.  Being perfectly satisfied with his own methods, he isn’t really interested in what I, or for that matter, anyone else does to pick winners.  I was amazed at this total confidence, as most players, including myself, are always looking for that extra new angle or magic formula to hit the big time with.

 

One of the things I noticed in his huge pile of notes were sheets containing twenty columns of check boxes.  He explained that these were twenty different racing systems.  Not one system with twenty rules, mind you, but TWENTY DIFFERENT WAYS OF PICKING HORSES.  They range in size and complexity from quick angles to quite complex rules of engagement. 

 

Of course, I immediately asked why he didn’t market these things and make some extra money.  For literally several years, he politely brushed aside these inquiries.  For several reasons.   First,  they ARE his, so why should he share them, even for money?  Second, he is a very busy guy, literally working all of his waking hours cataloging sires, writing columns, and putting his own home-grown ratings together.  Enter myself, Mr. Scribe.

 

Also, he thought all the rules, and where to get the information were too remote for most people to want to handle.  I said fine, that’s why God invented computers.  He said he didn’t trust computers, there were too many variables in his thinking.  I said maybe , but computers can crunch a lot of numbers faster than any person..  He replied “Anybody but me”.  To which I replied, “Well, everybody’s not you”, and on and on, literally for several years.

 

            Now I don’t want to say that the following is what turned it, but a month ago I asked “So, are you going to take your secrets to the grave with you?”.  Now I hope Tom is around for many more years, but he thought about that for awhile, and said “No, but I’m not sure that what’s in my head can be put down on paper in a manner I’d be satisfied with.  And I don’t want to sacrifice integrity for simplicity.”  I told him I was a systems analyst.  I take people’s ideas and put them on paper for a living.   I also suggested we break down the puzzle into twenty separate systems, each being able to stand on it’s own.  He said he’d think about it.

 

 Over several weeks, I had several multi-hour meetings with him. We took all twenty systems, and broke them down to their most simple levels.  They were actually fairly easy to program.

 

So I am announcing to the world that Tom Harkins has enough new ideas to keep RPM customers happy for the next several years. 

 

No, we’re not going to release the whole thing at once.  It would be too overwhelming.  Remember, these are not just twenty rules, but twenty ways of thinking, each with their own set of rules. 

 

There was some debate on which of the twenty different systems would be the first to be released. 

We picked the “Power Number Super Secret” Method first for several reasons

 

First, it is one of Tom’s strongest

 

He flatly states that anyone who does not include a horse that this method selects in their exotic wagering is playing foolishly, which is quite a statement.

 

When you see how easy this is to handicap, your first reaction might be “I could have done that!”.

But if you stay with it you will see that it is the adjustments he makes to this simple process that makes its MAGIC work.

 

 

And those adjustments are accomplished by the software, so you do no work whatsoever.

 

And if you opt for the paper & pencil version instead, the figuring will take you about 5 minutes per race.

 

 

 

Screen Shots: 

Below a great example of how SSM cuts thru the tons of data to come up with big-priced winners.  Here Hobbits Hero (1/1) and Papa’s Paisley (12/1) tie for the selection.  Ties don’t occur that often, but when they do always play the longest price — Papa’s Paisley returned $25 for the win.

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A Clear Selection — Flash Encounter — $33 to win!

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American Proud goes off at 24-to-1, runs 2nd

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Fly High is an SOR (SPEED OF RACE) Play.  Tom & Len have created a unique speed formulation that isolates the likely early leader.  As you well know, horses with contending speed win most races in North America, and a ‘Lone Speed’ horse often wires ’em.  This was the case here, as Fly High went wire-to-wire to pay $20 and Super Secret handed you the $108 Exacta on a platter as well.  The SPEED OF RACE feature enhances an already great winner selector in the Super Secret Method.

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 Home Run Kitten at $11.20  —  yes, the software does pick shorter prices as well, but the average SSM win mutuel is $12.43 — and the hit rate for win is close to 24% — providing the user with a Super Nice Return on Investment.  Profits on place betting as well.

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Below another SPEED OF RACE (SOR) winner at $27.40.  **Note also the BET 6 feature — this is a four-horse Exacta and/or Trifecta Box that we call ‘speculative’ — meaning that in fields of 8 horses or more this wager should strongly be considered — We have enjoyed many, many out-sized payoffs using this feature.

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You can Order The Super Secret Method Software NOW at a special price.  The regular retail will soon be $187, but your price for ordering NOW is just $131.

The Paper & Pencil version is $58

 

The Super Secret Software Package  Special Price $131

 

Super Secret Paper & Pencil Method  $58

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